Celebrating Everyday Vegetables With Sabzi Tarkari Day

Lauki, Tori, Bhendi, or be it Baingan Ka Bharta. Sabzi with roti is a ubiquitous part of the Indian cuisine. Through the initiative of Indian Food Observance Days taken up by Rushina Munshaw Ghildyal, a gastronome and food historian, we are all set to celebrate these sabzis that constitutes our everyday meal and the satiates us every day.

Sabzi Tarkari Day

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India has a wide variety of vegetables that are used in cooking, and yet at least 60% (a wild guess) still remains unexplored and not talked about. The issue is not valuing our tradition enough till it becomes “cool” to do so, but then why wait and why not jump right in and celebrate the exceptionally good produce that this country has to offer? If you follow @cheftzac of @thebombaycanteen you’ll see that he’s been taking us through vegetables that we’ve seen in the markets, but haven’t really stopped to ask what it is and what is made with that. Why? Do it now . . With @rushinamg proposing 31st March as #SubziTarkariDin, it is an opportunity for all food lovers to unite and come together to celebrate the subzis of India. 🥦🍠🥔🥕🌽🌶🍅 . I repeat, this is not about these individuals, it is about saving traditions and documenting them for the sake of the next generations and the present one. . . Here’s a simple and extremely rustic vegetable mix that my mother makes which usually includes vegetables I am not fond of, mixed with onions and potatoes (whole). The base is mustard oil, kalaunji and masalas like, coriander powder, red chillies powder, garam Masala, dry methi. The trick is to quarter these veggies and stuff the masala in them and then pan fry it in an iron wok and let the flavours come together in the wok. 😊 . . Celebrating our vegetables everyday, are we? Comment and tell me who’s in! 😊🙏🏼

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Celebrating Sabzi Tarkari Day on 31st March is a fun participation. One can involve their kids and simply take them to the vegetable market even letting them pick the one they like. Taking it a step further, you can encourage them to help you cook it too! Furthermore, one can celebrate this day by taking a selfie with your regular sabzi wala who you’ve bargained endlessly with and post the picture on social media with the hashtag #SabziTarkariDin.

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The man who gets farm fresh vegetables to my mother's gate every morning, come hail or high water. . . Even though he doesn't know anything about the #sabzitarkaridin he celebrats it every day anyway. . . Having grown up in a vegetarian household vegetables have always been an intrinsic part of food. That's as true for me, as it is for a majority of Indians. But somewhere along the line, in our race to modernize, we are forgetting this important part of our diet. . . I am celebrating #sabjitarkaridiwas on 31st March with @rushinamg, @apbcookstudio, and hundreds of others by cooking my favorite vegetables. Are you? . . #delhi #ifod #india #indiantravel #smalltownindia #sabjitarkari #wanderlust #travel #vegan #regionalcuisine #instafood #vegetablegarden #indiantraveler #bbcgoodfood #foodgawker #huffpostgram #huffposttaste #apbcookstudio #eeeeeats #vegetarian #indianfoodmovement #localfood

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“Vegetables play an intrinsic role in our food, but seldom get their due,” says Ghildiyal on her blog post. “And more so in recent years. Many factors, including the growth of supermarkets and convenience stores, have led to a monumental decrease in the variety of vegetables and dishes made with them that we consume. We also tend to eat what is packaged up for us – cauliflowers without the green parts, Mooli without the leaves and more.”

Celebrating Everyday Vegetables With Sabzi Tarkari Day

One can get involved in so many ways in Indian Food Observance Days, it’s unbelievable. You can have a potluck with each of your friends bringing in a sabzi well known from the diverse regions of India. Exploring food, sharing food and talking more and more about Indian cuisine is the key here. Ghildiyal herself made us a lovely Red Poha Salad using stalks and stems of cauliflower which people tend to discard. So yet again, utilising all parts of the vegetable also plays a role in celebrating this amazing day. But do share it with the world so that it encourages others and Sabzi Tarkari Din becomes a strong initiative and a day to look forward to just like Pizza Day, Pie Day and French Crepe Day. Here are more ways to celebrate.

Indian Food Observance Days

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A simple meal like this is what my heart sings to. On the plate 🌸Brown rice 🌸Lal shaker charchari or red amaranth with brinjal and fish oil 🌸Kumro fuler bawra /pumpkin blossom fritter 🌸Plain masoor dal with panchforon/ red lentil soup with Bengali five spice 🌸alu patoler dalna chola die/pointed gourd curry with black chick peas 🌸Dimer dalna or Bengali egg curry 🌸 And a glass of South Indian style buttermilk. A must for us during summer. . And no this is not a recent meal. Am yet to gain strength to cook such elaborate meals. Thanks you for all your wishes. It means a lot.🙏 . . . . #ahomemakersdiary #traditionalbengalirecipes #sayantanirecipes #fbai #foodloversindia #saveur #betterhomesandgardensindia #indiaigers #kolkataig #kfb #lonelyplanetindia #foodtalkindia #ig_calcutta #blogger #indianfoodstories #still_life_gallery #goodfoodindia #indianfood #indianvegetarianmeal #indianfoodiye #indianfoodiesquad #amarkolkata #tasteofkolkata #indiafoodnetwork #foodfood #foodtalkindia #sabzitarkaridin

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“Around 20 March​ 2017​, two things happened. I was preparing to help celebrate Macaroon Day and Good France Day,” says Ghildiyal. “And my husband commented on how we celebrate all these food days from the west and so few Indian themed food days. And just after this conversation I woke up to Twitter resonating over #PakhalaDibasa (Universal Pakhala Day) being celebrated by Odias worldwide. It got me thinking… and googling. I discovered the concept of Observance days and the many, many Food Observance Days social media has been amplifying.”

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This illness of mine is making me falling out of schedule but finally I have stopped trying to post recipes with ingredients that are in season. At least that way one can use the recipe next season. Sorry for not being able to post the piring shaak recipe on time. Hopefully soon this wonderful greens would be on blog. . #ahomemakersdiary #traditionalbengalirecipes #sayantanirecipes #fbai #foodloversindia #saveur #betterhomesandgardensindia #indiaigers #kolkataig #kfb #lonelyplanetindia #foodtalkindia #ig_calcutta #blogger #indianfoodstories #still_life_gallery #goodfoodindia #indianfood #indianvegetarianmeal #indianfoodiye #indianfoodiesquad #amarkolkata #tasteofkolkata #indiafoodnetwork #foodfood #foodtalkindia #sabzitarkaridin

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And that was the beginning of Indian Food Observance Days, a cause Ghildiyal encourages everybody to take up and for a good reason too. “Food observance days might not seem important in the larger scheme of things but as someone in the food industry of India, which the world is looking at as the next big food market, which is in so much growth, I worry we will lose our culinary heritage. Being a culture that has been passed down orally we lose so much with each generation that passes. This might be the last generation to have food knowledge to pass on. So I did wonder why we cannot have more Indian food observance days. After all we are the country whose national pastime is food – the eating and the talking about – of it, isn’t it? And I decided to do something about it.”